Nana, Vol. 2: v. 2

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NANA AMPADU MIX VOL 2 by Yaw pele

I enjoyed this more than vol. Read for Contemporaryathon Feb Mar 27, Suleyka Bonifacio rated it it was amazing. In this book Nana O. At first Hachi or the other Nana had moved in with her boyfriend but he kicked her out so she had to become independent. About things she went through and things that happened before she moved to Tokyo. I love this book and i recommend it. Sep 28, Jacob rated it really liked it. Even though my star rating is the same for v.


  • Nana, Vol. 13;
  • Missa Brevis: For SATB, A Cappella Chorus/Choir with Latin Text (Choral Score) (Kalmus Edition).
  • Βιογραφία συγγραφέα: Yazawa Ai!

Less plot somehow than the first, but Nana is much more about personalities and their interactions than plot advancement, so this is a good thing. Sharp writing and some really fabulous expressions on the characters esp. Nana 1 make this an easy volume to consume. Apr 14, Abeer Albossany rated it it was ok. The volume started by the two Nanas meeting and separating only to meet again on hunting a flat. They decided to live together and things started looking good for them.

Nana, Volume 18

Nobo comes at the last chapter and with Nana they managed to make that night a great live concert for Hachico, the other Nana. Oh my goodness this series is so good! Nov 26, Jazzi Kelley added it. I still don't know. It's either full of boring stereotypes or building up to something painfully honest. Mar 26, Mary Shyne rated it it was amazing. May 16, The Inked Reader rated it really liked it Shelves: read-from-the-library , Oct 06, Briana rated it it was amazing Shelves: manga.

Quick cute read learned more about Nana and Nana's relationship and moving in. Sep 16, Elaine rated it really liked it. This is what I loved about the anime so much! The characters feel real, yet a bit over exaggerated. The story begins to pick up and you begin to learn more about the characters backstories. Feb 05, Louise rated it really liked it.

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This one focused more on the cool Nana, so I liked it more. Jun 17, Classical Lady rated it really liked it.


  • Management Training on Leadership Communication Skills: How to Talk in a Meeting and Give Constructive Feedback at Work so People Listen to You;
  • Nana, Vol. 13 by Ai Yazawa!
  • Le Mec de la tombe dà côté (Mazetti) (French Edition).
  • The Course of the Second World War in Europe, Africa and Russia.
  • Nana, Vol. 3 v. 3.
  • Glaucidium nana (Austral Pygmy-Owl) - Avibase.

Mar 08, Clara rated it it was amazing Shelves: manga-graphic-comics. I just love Nana so much - this particular volume is a classic!

Factors Affecting the Protoplast Isolation and Culture of Anubias nana Engler

Dec 31, Lucy rated it it was amazing. Feb 15, Trane rated it really liked it Recommends it for: tokyo pseudo punks, the hair tribe, lovers of shojo manga, smilers. Shelves: manga-and-comics.

ulunblanerki.tk I'm completely addicted to Ai Yazawa's shojo manga Nana. Nana is the story of two young women, both from small towns, who meet on the bullet train and end up moving in together in Tokyo. Nana Komatsu a. This all sounds like pretty standard fare so far, but once you throw in copious p I'm completely addicted to Ai Yazawa's shojo manga Nana. This all sounds like pretty standard fare so far, but once you throw in copious piercings, an underage bass-playing rent boy, art school friends, non-stop smoking, all-night parties, a cute sweety gothy fangirl, a deep romance between Nana O.

Yazawa does a few things really well in Nana. First, she creates characters that you can get attached to really easily so that you want to follow their stories. Once you're invested in the characters, the melodrama and gossip that mounts are unrelenting. Reading this manga kind of feels just like when one of your friends hands you some delicious, and perhaps slightly malicious, secret tidbit about a friend or acquaintance, usually prefaced with the phrase "Don't tell anyone.

This use of a secondary emotional language in illustration works in conjunction with the melodrama in a way that's far more affective than anything I can imagine in cinema. What Yazawa does best of all, however, is to deeply imagine the wide variety of affections, desires, and types of love that can run through groups of people without trying to simplify the complex emotional relationships that result.

The non-sexual, but definitely erotic love between Nana and Nana is given more space in this manga than even the more traditional romantic encounters between the Nanas and their heterosexual partners. The idea of "love" that has managed to drop itself into the English language is severely inadequate to describe the types of emotional attachments that Yazawa instigates and investigates in Nana — perhaps a more appropriate way to approach the relationships presented in Nana would be to invoke the numerous Greek words for love and use those varietals as a jumping off point.

For all its melodramatics and emphasis on young love and rock-and-roll, this series is hauntingly elegiac. The events told in the story itself take place in a past that's registered in the key of loss by the voice of a disembodied narrator that appears throughout the course of the narrative: "I'll still call out for you, Nana. Whether or not anything is gained in the tradeoff will be the point of interest to look out for. The reason I give four stars to the series instead of five is that, as entertaining as it is, it's mostly a kind of pop entertainment.

Sharply felt, deeply delightful, but finally not one for the ages. View 2 comments. Nov 07, Cera rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. For simplicity's sake, I'm going to refer to Nana K by her nickname of Hachi, even though she doesn't acquire the nickname immediately. The charm of this volume comes in large part, I think, from having seen both Nanas separately in the first volume, and now seeing what happens when they meet on the train for Tokyo, discover the coincidence of their shared names, and from there strike up a long conversation -- which, unsurprisingly, seems to be mostly Hachi talking and Nana O laughing For simplicity's sake, I'm going to refer to Nana K by her nickname of Hachi, even though she doesn't acquire the nickname immediately.

The charm of this volume comes in large part, I think, from having seen both Nanas separately in the first volume, and now seeing what happens when they meet on the train for Tokyo, discover the coincidence of their shared names, and from there strike up a long conversation -- which, unsurprisingly, seems to be mostly Hachi talking and Nana O laughing. A few days later the two girls meet again, both looking at the same apartment, and decide on a whim to move in together.

This sets up the relationship that the rest of the manga series explores; two very different young women living together, each of whom needs the other more than they realise. The story is made more poingnant by narrative framing from Hachi, who reflects on the action from some future time, alternately critiquing and celebrating her younger self. Once again, the story touches on the contrast between consumption and creativity. Hachi finds her ideal job in a vintage shop where she can spend most of her paycheck on the cute things she's supposed to be selling, while Nana, after a push from her former bandmates, declares her intention of putting together a band in Tokyo and making it as a singer.

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Nana is entertained by Hachi's material enjoyment, while Hachi is in awe of Nana's talent and drive. Meanwhile, Hachi is struggling to balance her belief that she needs to learn independence with the reality that she's happiest taking care of others; her confused scenes with her well-meaning but inarticulate boyfriend are painfully realistic. He dreams of someday marrying her, but panics when she spends her first day in Tokyo cleaning and cooking for him; she's hurt by what she perceives as his rejection while believing she deserves it for her clinginess, and this sets her up to throw herself whole-heartedly into her friendship with Nana.

It's interesting to me that at first I didn't recognise Hachi's creativity in the domestic sphere -- what used to be called 'homemaking' -- but of course, domestic creativity has long been reframed as a form of material consumption, and her caretaking is half creative and half about the placement and appreciation of bought objects, so There's a lot of humour in these early chapters, but there's pain as well, and I found it especially realistic when Hachi reflects at the end of chapter 3 that although she saw Nana's pain from the beginning of their friendship, she "chalked it up to another cool thing about you" rather than thinking about how to help.

It's one of those moments that hit me hard emotionally, because as a reader I do find Nana's pain and her loss very 'cool,' very appealing and compelling, and yet of course in a real human being I would feel compassion and the desire to console. So again, Hachi is the shoujo who views and consumes, and as the reader is inevitably in that position with regard to the manga, her self-reflection feeds back into the reader's response to the text.

I think -- I hope -- that a big focus of this story is going to be Hachi changing her ground and becoming someone who acts rather than consumes. Jun 15, Sarah Sammis rated it it was amazing Shelves: pc , read-in I had been interested in it since Amazon had recommended it to me but I didn't start the series until Dewey also recommended it.

The series is rapidly becoming one of favorite "guilty pleasures. Nana Volume 2 finds both Nanas on the train to Tokyo. They expect to go their separate ways but fate or the demon lord if you ask Nana Komatsu brings t Back in July I reviewed the first volume of the shojo manga, Nana by Ai Yazawa.

They expect to go their separate ways but fate or the demon lord if you ask Nana Komatsu brings them back together in a most unexpected way. They both want the same apartment. It's in an ideal location and though still very expensive, very cheap for Tokyo prices. The only way to get the apartment they both want but can't afford is to share the lease. Most of volume 2 centers around the apartment and the difficulties they have with it.

GROW nano vol.2(GAME)

The apartment is old and they are novices at renting, especially Nana K. There is the lack of power, lack of heat, and the need for cosigners. The other half is divided between Nana K's new job at an awesome looking retro furniture and clothing store and the growing friendship between the two Nanas. Posted by Anonymous July 19, PM. Posted by Anonymous August 1, PM. Posted by Anonymous August 6, AM. Posted by random August 6, PM. Posted by Anonymous August 11, PM. Posted by Skyler August 14, PM. Posted by Anonymous August 16, AM. Posted by Heyyy August 18, PM. Posted by canda August 27, PM.

Posted by aaron August 31, PM. Posted by Elena September 9, AM. Posted by Lulu September 13, PM.